1965-66
19-6 Overall; 12-2 Ivy League
The Quakers made the most of Princeton’s Bill Bradley’s graduation and broke the Tigers’ hold on the Ivy League title in 1966. A 56-48 win over the Tigers in the last game of the season gave Head Coach Jack McCloskey’s Quakers their first Ivy League title and first basketball championship since 1953. Led by three-time All-Ivy co-captains Stan Pawlak and Jeff Neuman, Penn finished the season 19-6 overall and 12-2 in the Ivy League and accumulated its most wins in league competition since 1937.

1969-70
25-2 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
Head Coach Dick Harter led the Quakers to their second Ivy League title in grand fashion, with a perfect 14-0 record. The Quakers opened the season with a 115-79 rout of Muhlenberg, and went on to a 7-0 start before falling to Purdue, 88-85, in the ECAC Holiday Festival. Penn did not drop another game until the NCAA Tournament, when Niagara handed the Quakers a 10-point loss, 79-69, in the first round. Penn also claimed just its second Philadelphia Big 5 title with convincing wins over all four schools, and the Quakers finished the season ranked No. 13 in both the AP and UPI polls at the end of the season. Corky Calhoun, who was named Penn’s MVP, and Steve Bilsky were named first-team All-Ivy, while Robert Morse was honored with second-team accolades.

1970-71
28-1 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
Arguably the greatest team ever to come from this proud program, the 1970-71 Quakers finished the regular season undefeated at 26-0, won the Ivy League title with an unblemished record and didn’t really face any serious threats throughout the Ivy season except for a four-point overtime win over Princeton at The Palestra. Head Coach Dick Harter led the Quakers into the NCAA Tournament where they faced Duquesne in the first round and won, 70-65. South Carolina came next, and the Quakers improved their win streak to 28 games with a 79-64 victory. Unfortunately, Villanova had much improved since Penn had last saw the Wildcats on January 28 -- a 78-70 Penn win -- and pounded the Quakers, 90-47, in the East Regional Final. The Quakers finished the season with a No. 3 ranking from both the AP and UPI polls, and Dave Wohl was named ECAC All-Division I, first-team All-Ivy and All-District along with Steve Bilsky and Corky Calhoun.

1971-72
25-3 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
The Penn duo of Corky Calhoun and Robert Morse made some major waves in their senior season, which was also Head Coach Chuck Daly’s first campaign at Penn. After Penn’s phenomenal campaign in 1970-71, the Quakers came back and won another Ivy League championship -- falling only to Princeton, 69-56, at Jadwin -- and the Big 5 title with a 3-1 record. The duo led the Quakers into the NCAA Tournament, where Penn defeated Providence, 76-60, in the first round and Villanova, 78-67, in the second round before succumbing to North Carolina, 73-59, in the East Regional Final. Penn finished the season ranked No. 2 in the AP poll and No. 3 in the UPI poll. Calhoun was named Eastern Player of the Year, while Morse was named District Player of the Year, and both were named first-team All-Ivy along with Phil Hankinson.

1972-73
21-7 Overall; 12-2 Ivy League
The Quakers just kept on winning -- Ivy championships, that is. Daly won his second consecutive Ivy title, and the fourth-straight for the Penn basketball program. Phil Hankinson and Ron Haigler were the big names, as both were named All-East and All-Ivy League, and Hankinson racked up All-Big 5 and AP All-State accolades while Haigler was named ECAC Rookie of the Year and Ivy Sophomore of the Year. The Quakers made their way to yet another NCAA tourney game and defeated St. John’s by one point, 62-61, to move on to the second round. They found themselves against a familiar foe in round two, but this time they fell to Providence, 87-65. Penn then lost, 69-68, to Syracuse in the consolation game to end the season.

1973-74
21-6 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
The Quakers won their fifth consecutive Ivy League championship, falling only to Brown, 66-65, in Providence. Penn also won the Philadelphia Big 5 championship with a perfect 4-0 record, which included an 83-61 rout of Villanova at The Palestra. Junior Ron Haigler and ECAC Rookie of the Year John Engles helped lead the Quakers into the NCAA Tournament for the fifth-straight year, but they fell to Providence, 84-69. Haigler and John Beecroft were both named first-team All-Ivy, and Haigler was also named first-team All-Big 5 and AP All-State.

1974-75
23-5 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
Head Coach Chuck Daly served up his fourth consecutive Ivy League title with a 13-1 record. The Quakers went undefeated at home in The Palestra until the final game of the season, when they fell to Kansas State, 69-62, in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. The Quakers began the season by winning the Clemson Tournament championship, after besting Middle Tennessee State and Clemson, and then shot out to a 6-0 record before falling to Ohio State in the Rainbow Classic, where Ron Haigler was named MVP. Haigler also earned a few other accolades -- including Philadelphia Big 5 and Ivy League Player of the Year, third-team All-American, All-East, All-District, first-team All-Big 5 and All-Ivy -- after averaging 21.6 points per game.

1977-78
20-8 Overall; 12-2 Ivy League
There wasn’t a whole lot left to say about Keven McDonald on his graduation day from the Quakers’ basketball team in 1978. He was named Ivy League and Big 5 Player of the Year, led the Ivy League in scoring, earned Carolina Classic MVP and first-team All-Big 5 and All-Ivy honors. Penn finished the Ivy season with losses to Dartmouth and Columbia, but took home the first Ivy title for first-year Head Coach Bob Weinhauer and headed into the NCAA Tournament. The Quakers defeated St. Bonaventure, 92-83, at The Palestra in the first round, but then fell to Duke in the second round in Providence, R.I., 84-80, to end the season.

1978-79
25-7 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
After an impressive start to the season, the Quakers coasted to an 85-72 win over Cornell on Feb. 24, wrapped up the Ivy League title with three games still to go, and became the first team in the nation to qualify for the NCAA Tournament. Seniors Tony Price and Bobby Willis led the Quakers to a 73-69 win over Iona in the preliminary round of the NCAAs to start the magical ride of 1979. The Quakers traveled to Raleigh, N.C. for a first-round meeting with UNC and defeated the Tar Heels, 72-71, to move on in the draw. The Orangemen of Syracuse were next, and Penn won that game, 84-76, to move on to the Eastern Regional Final against St. John’s in Greensboro, N.C. Another nailbiter ensued, but the Quakers came out victorious, 64-62, and Penn fans made their travel plans for the Quakers’ first trip to the Final Four. Price, who had led the Quakers in scoring all season averaging 19.8 points per game, combined with Tim Smith for 27 of Penn’s 35 second-half points, and was named MVP of the Eastern Regional. Although very exciting for the first-time program, Penn found itself overmatched by Magic Johnson and Michigan State and fell, 101-67, in the national semifinal. The Quakers then lost again in the consolation game, 96-93 in overtime, to DePaul to finish their storybook season with a 25-7 overall record. Price finished the season as the Ivy League and Big 5 Player of the Year and the Quakers finished the season 14th in the Associated Press poll.

1979-80
17-12 Overall; 11-3 Ivy League
(co-champions with Princeton)
After such a successful season in 1978-79, fans wondered whether there would be any gas left in 1980 for the Quakers to make another run at the Ancient Eight title. Fortunately, there was plenty, as Penn went 11-3 in the Ivy League and fought bitter rival Princeton for the right to go onto the NCAA Tournament. In an historic one-game playoff, the Quakers defeated the Tigers, 50-49, behind captain James Salters’ 15 points. Penn went on to represent the Ivy League in the NCAA Tournament and defeated Washington State, 62-55, in West Lafayette, Ind. Unfortunately, Duke stood in the way of another return trip to the Final Four, and the Blue Devils handed the Quakers a 52-42 loss to end the season. 

1980-81
20-8 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
(co-champions with Princeton)
For the second year in a row, the Quakers ended the 1981 basketball season as co-champions of the Ivy League with Princeton, as both sported identical 13-1 records. The Tigers then defeated Penn in a playoff game, 54-40, at Lafayette, and went on to the NCAA Tournament. But, with Penn’s excellent Ivy League season, and a 20-7 regular season mark, the Quakers made their first and only appearance in the NIT against West Virginia on March 13, 1981. Unfortunately, the Quakers could not hang on, and fell, 67-64, in the first round. Senior Kenneth Hall was named first-team All-Ivy.

1981-82
17-10 Overall; 12-2 Ivy League
In Head Coach Bob Weinhauer’s last season, the Quakers put together a string of 14 consecutive victories to claim their fifth-straight Ivy League title with a 12-2 League record. Beginning with a 58-44 win over Penn State in The Palestra, the Quakers stormed through the Ivy League, and even defeated Temple, 59-56, in the process to head back to the NCAA Tournament after a one-year absence. Penn fell to St. John’s, 66-56, in the first round in Uniondale, N.Y. Senior captain Paul Little was named Ivy League Co-Player of the Year, along with Princeton’s Craig Robinson

1984-85
13-14 Overall; 10-4 Ivy League
The Quakers had a rough start to open the 1984-85 season, going 0-7 before winning the first game of the campaign, 81-80, over Davidson in the Far West Classic. But fear not. Penn went on to claim the Ivy League title, it’s fourth of the 1980s, behind first-team All-Ivy honoree Perry Bromwell. At one point, the Quakers reeled off eight straight wins before falling to Princeton, 49-47, at The Palestra. The Quakers traveled to Houston, Texas for the first round of the NCAA Tournament where they fell, 67-55, to Memphis State.

1986-87
13-14 Overall; 10-4 Ivy League
Ivy League Player of the Year Perry Bromwell led Tom Schneider’s first Penn team to its 13th Ivy title with a 10-4 record in 1986-87. Bromwell also was named first-team All-Ivy, Penn MVP and Penn Best Defensive Player, while teammate Bruce Lefkowitz was also named first-team All-Ivy and Penn MVP. The Quakers pulled out of a tough Ancient Eight race with a one-point overtime win versus Princeton on Feb. 3, and wins over Brown and Yale in the final two games of the regular season to earn the right to play UNC in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. Penn fell, 113-82, to the Tar Heels.

1992-93
22-5 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
The Quakers won their first Ivy League championship under Head Coach Fran Dunphy with only the second undefeated season since 1976. It was almost for naught, though, as the Quakers had to pull a rabbit out of their hat in the final game of the regular season against Princeton, 52-51, at Jadwin. Jerome Allen became the first sophomore to be named Ivy League Player of the Year. The Quakers fell to UMass, 54-50, in Dunphy’s first trip to the NCAA Tournament.

1993-94
25-3 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
Ivy League Player of the Year Jerome Allen helped continue the Quakers’ Ivy League win streak as Penn recorded another 14-0 Ancient Eight season in 1993-94, just the second back-to-back undefeated Ivy League championships in league history. Penn lost just three games all season, including a 70-58 loss to Florida in the second round of the NCAA Tournament. The Quakers recorded their first first-round tournament win since 1980 with a 90-80 victory over Nebraska. Head Coach Fran Dunphy also saw his team crack the AP poll for the first time since 1979, and finish ranked 25th in the nation by the USA Today/CNN coaches poll.

1994-95
22-6 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
Penn began the season on a high note by winning the 1994 ECAC Holiday Festival at Madison Square Garden, and then ended the season on a higher note by winning its 17th Ivy League championship trophy. Seniors Matt Maloney and Jerome Allen were all the rage, as they helped lead the team to a program and conference-record 42 consecutive Ivy League wins and their third consecutive Ivy title. Maloney was named Ivy League Player of the Year, and the Quakers just missed pulling off an upset of Alabama in the first round of the NCAA Tournament in Baltimore, Md., falling 91-85.

1995-96
17-10 Overall; 12-2 Ivy League
(co-champions with Princeton)
Penn continued its run of Ivy championships in 1995-96, but this time the Quakers had to do so with Princeton. Even though the Quakers defeated the Tigers twice during the regular season, they fell on the road to Dartmouth and Yale and were tied with their arch-rivals atop the conference standings at the end of the season. A one-game playoff ensued at Stabler Arena in Bethlehem, Pa., and Penn was defeated in overtime, 63-56, allowing Princeton to represent the Ivy League in the NCAA Tournament. Penn’s senior co-captain, Ira Bowman, was named Ivy League Player of the Year.

1998-99
21-6 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
In one of the most shocking games in The Palestra’s long history, Penn held a 33-9 lead over rival Princeton at halftime but then fell to the Tigers, 50-49. However, that proved to be the Quakers’ only conference blemish of the season, and they got their revenge in the final game of the season with a 73-48 win over the Tigers at Jadwin. Penn traveled to Seattle for the first round of the NCAA Tournament and fell to Florida, 75-61.

1999-2000
21-8 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
Penn went 14-0 in the Ivy League for the first time since 1994-95 to win its 20th Ivy League title. Senior captains Michael Jordan and Matt Langel were both named first-team All-Ivy, and “MJ” was named Ivy Player of the Year. The Quakers had no trouble handling the likes of the Ancient Eight, as the only close game of the season came in a 62-61 win at Harvard. Penn went on to the first round of the 2000 NCAA Tournament in Winston-Salem, N.C. where it fell to Illinois, 68-58.

2001-02
25-7 Overall; 11-3 Ivy League
(tri-champions with Princeton, Yale)
The Quakers found themselves at 2-3 in the Ivy League standings after falling to Yale in the final seconds in New Haven on Feb. 8. What happened after that game found many a naysayer believing in “Penn Power.” The Quakers went on a tear and won their next nine games to force the Ivy League’s first-ever three-way tie for first place (with Penn, Princeton and Yale). The Quakers received a bye in the first round of the playoff, then eliminated Yale’s hopes of becoming the first team besides Penn or Princeton to represent the Ivy League in the NCAA Tournament since 1988 with a convincing, 77-58 victory in Easton, Pa. Penn made its sixth trip to the NCAA Tournament under Head Coach Fran Dunphy and fell to Cal, 82-75, in the first round.

2002-03
22-6 Overall; 14-0 Ivy League
Another rough start (3-4 non-league) plagued the highly-touted Quakers, as a group of six seniors looked to put their final exclamation point on the Penn record books. Yet at the end of the regular season, the Red and Blue were riding a 15-game winning streak and heading to their second-straight NCAA Tournament appearance after going undefeated in the Ancient Eight for the fifth time under Head Coach Fran Dunphy. All five starters received All-Ivy honors, with Ugonna Onyekwe once again being named Player of the Year and unanimous first-team All-Ivy. The Quakers also looked to be the “upset team” at the FleetCenter in Boston as they took on Oklahoma State in first round of the NCAAs.  Unfortunately, the Quakers could not catch a hot-shooting Victor Williams in the final six minutes of the game and fell, 77-63, to finish the four-year dream of the Class of 2003.

2004-05
20-8 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
The Quakers wrapped up the 2004-05 Ivy League championship with three games to go, a milestone in Ivy history as just two other basketball teams (the 1979 Quakers and the 1991 Princeton Tigers) achieved the same feat.  Despite a 4-7 record to open the new season, the Quakers regrouped and began an 11-game win streak with an 89-62 victory at Siena on January 15. Penn went 13-1 in the Ancient Eight, being tripped up only by Yale in New Haven on February 19. Penn returned to the NCAA Tournament for the eighth time in the last 13 years, losing to Boston College in the first round.

2005-06
20-8 Overall; 12-2 Ivy League
Penn ran away with its 24th Ivy League title with a 12-2 League record after winning its first seven Ancient Eight games. Only away losses to Columbia and Princeton -- one on a last-second tip-in, the other at the buzzer in overtime -- blemished the record; for the second year in a row, the Quakers did not lose to a League team at The Palestra. With another 20-win season under their belts, the Quakers headed to the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship tournament for the ninth time in 14 years, falling to No. 2 seed Texas in Dallas, Texas. Junior guard Ibrahim Jaaber -- who became the program's all-time steals leader and its latest 1,000-point scorer -- was the Ivy League Player of the Year, while junior Mark Zoller joined Jaaber in earning first-team All-Ivy honors. Senior Eric Osmundson and junior Steve Danley were honorable mention All-Ivy selections.

2006-07
22-9 Overall; 13-1 Ivy League
Under first-year head coach Glen Miller, the biggest question of the season came not in whether or not Penn would win its 25th Ivy League championship, but rather who would win Ivy League Player of the Year -- Ibrahim Jaaber or Mark Zoller? In the end, Jaaber was awarded the honor for the second-straight season, but he and Zoller were both unanimous first-team All-Ivy selections. The Quakers’ only blemish during the Ivy season came at Yale, but turnabout was fair play a month later when Penn jumped out to a 24-4 lead on Yale and cruised to an 86-58 win that sealed the Ivy title on the Palestra floor. The Quakers enjoyed their third-straight undefeated Ivy League home campaign, and had an average victory margin of 13.9 points per game. In the NCAA Tournament, Penn met Texas A&M in the first round; the Quakers held the lead briefly midway through the second half, but ultimately fell to the Aggies, 68-52.