Hall of Fame Inaugural Class - Biographies

Inaugural Class of the Penn Athletic Hall of Fame - April, 1996

•Robert G. Allman
•Diane Marie Angstadt
•Francis "Reds" Bagnell
•Hope Barnes
•Ernie Beck
•Charles "Chuck" Bednarik
•Barney Berlinger
•Barney Berlinger, Jr.
•Joseph W. Burk
•Gardner A. Cadwalader
•David "Corky" Calhoun
•Richard J. Censits
•Donald A. Clune
•Bruce R. Collins
•Lajos S. Csiszar
•Eleanor "Ellie" Daniel
•Richard DiBatista
•Paul R. Friedberg
•Ronald Haigler
•Dick Harter
•William M. Hollenback
•Peter H. Hollis
•Donald S. Kellett
•Jack Kelly
•Henry Kozloff
•Bernie Lemonick
•William E. Lingelbach, Jr.
•Howard "Zip" Long
•H. Hunter Lott, Jr.
•P. Todd Makler, Jr.
•Sherry A. Marcantonio
•Alicia McConnell
•Edward F. McGinley, Jr.
•David A. Merrick
•Anthony "Skip" Minisi
•Robert Morse
•George Munger
•Bob Odell
•Mary Jane O'Neill
•Michael R. Page
•Palmer T. H. Page
•Anthony Price
•Francis X. Reagan
•Charles R. Scott
•Stanley E. Startzell
•Julie Ann Staver

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Robert G. Allman
Bob Allman's life was one of the greatest success stories in Pennsylvania athletic annals. Sightless from the age of four, he became an intercollegiate wrestling champion (captain of the Quaker wrestling squad his senior year), and was later a successful lawyer (Penn Law 1942) in the Philadelphia area.

A 1939 graduate, Allman was the recipient of the Class of 1915 Award, bestowed annually on that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete. He was believed to be the first blind athlete ever to compete with sighted athletes in any American sport, and was the first to be awarded a varsity letter at the University of Pennsylvania.

In 1940, Allman was presented the Most Courageous Athlete Award by the Philadelphia Sports Writers Association. In accepting the award he thanked all of his coaches and acknowledged his brother George as his inspiration. Among his remarks at the Sports Writers banquet on Jan. 30, 1940: This coveted award is most highly prized and will always be the most cherish trophy of my career I have done nothing more than the average American boy Courage is nothing more than doing the best you can in the good old American Way.

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Diane Marie Angstadt
Diane Angstadt was the definition of student-athlete during her four years at Pennsylvania. A letterwinner in both field hockey and basketball, she was the recipient of the Fathers Trophy in 1981 as the outstanding senior woman student-athlete. She was co-recipient of the Frazier Award as the Pennsylvania student-athlete with the highest grade-point average while enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences, the first woman to receive the latter honor. Nicknamed Ace by her teammates, Angstadt, who captained the Quakers as a senior, was one of the great field hockey players in Pennsylvania history. Twice chosen to the all-Ivy League first team, she was the Ivy League Player of the Year as a senior in 1980. She is still among the all-time school leaders in career points (78), goals (29) and assists (20). The field hockey team's most Inspirational Award is named for her.

Angstadt suffered a severe knee injury while playing basketball as a sophomore, but recovered to earn a berth on the U.S. national field hockey team following both her junior and senior seasons. Today, Dr. Angstadt is a specialist in adult and geriatric psychiatry. She earned a Medical Degree from Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine in Hershey in 1986.

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Francis Reds Bagnell
A sports legend in Philadelphia, Reds Bagnell was considered one of the best college tailbacks in America in 1950 when he set two national single-game records for total offense and placed third in the Heisman Trophy voting behind Vic Janowicz of Ohio State and Kyle Rote of Southern Methodist.

One of Penn's most celebrated athletes, Reds played during the golden era of Penn football, when the Quakers competed against top ranked colleges from across the country and drew record crowds of 60,000-80,000 to Franklin Field.

He grew up in West Philadelphia, living in a house which is now part of the extended Philadelphia campus. He attended West Catholic High School and played in Franklin Field in one of the most famous scholastic games in city history, and was an All-American quarterback under George Munger. He won nine varsity letters in college, three each for football, basketball and baseball.

His greatest collegiate game was against Dartmouth in 1950, when he accounted for 490 yards of total offense and competed a national record of 14 consecutive passes in a 42-26 Pennsylvania victory at Franklin Field. A 1951 graduate, Bagnell, who captained the Quakers' football team as a senior, was the recipient of the Class of 1915 Award, bestowed annually on that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

In 1982 President Reagan appointed Bagnell to the American Battle Monuments Commission, and later Bagnell was appointed to the National Finance Committee by President Bush. Bagnell later became an associate trustee at Pennsylvania and a trustee of Hahnemann University Hospital. He also served as chairman of the Maxwell Football Club, and served a term as president of the National Football Foundation College Hall of Fame, an organization into which he was inducted in 1977.

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Hope Barnes
Hope Barnes was a 1980 graduate of Pennsylvania and rowed with Penn's undefeated national championship women's crew of 1980.

As one of only three seniors on the varsity eight, she was a leader of a team which was not only undefeated, but also led every race from start to finish. She was later a member of both the 1980 and 1984 U.S. Olympic crews.

Barnes was working toward a Ph.D. at the University of Washington in 1991 when she died at the age of 33 in a fall while climbing Dragontail Peak in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area. Several months prior she had returned to Pennsylvania for a 10-year reunion of the national championship team. She made the following remarks about the team:

It was the epitome of a team effort. Nobody was a standout in athletic talent. Everyone worked very hard We felt that there was a real opportunity to have something special. It was the coming together of a tremendous diversity in people.

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Ernie Beck
Ernie Beck was one of the greatest basketball players in Philadelphia collegiate history, and still holds 10 Pennsylvania school records 43 years after playing his last collegiate game.

A three-year varsity letterwinner, Beck holds the school records for most points in a career (1,827), season (673, 1952-53) and a game (47, vs. Duke, 1952-53). He also holds school records for rebounds in a career (1,557) and season (556, 1950-51); field goals made in a career (704); free throws made and attempted in one season (183 for 229, 1952-53); and the highest career and one-season scoring averages (22.3, 25.9, in 1952-53).

Pennsylvania had a combined record of 62-21 in his three varsity seasons, and played in the NCAA Tournament for the first time in school history in Beck's senior year. He was a first-round draft choice for the Philadelphia Warriors, played six seasons in the NBA, and was a member of the Warriors' 1956 NBA championship team.

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Charles Chuck Bednarik
Chuck Bednarik was the last of football's iron men. In an age of two-man platooning, he played 60 minutes a game, offense and defense at the most grueling positions of center and linebacker.

By the time Bednarik entered Penn in 1945, he was already 20 years old and had flown 30 combat missions over Germany as a gunner. By his junior year, he was a first-team choice of five different All-America selectors. By his senior year he was a legend and the All-America choice of virtually every selector in the country.

Following the 1948 season he received the Maxwell Award, given to the player whom the Maxwell Club of Philadelphia considers the outstanding collegiate player of the nation. He was the first offensive lineman to receive the award.

Following graduation he was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles, who then played at Franklin Field. He shifted between playing center and linebacker, as he had in college, and was an all-pro selection at both positions during his 14-year professional career.

Concrete Charlie received his greatest acclaim during the Eagles' 1960 NFL Championship season when he played both center and linebacker throughout the season. He was on the field for nearly every play of the championship game with the Green Bay Packers. He is a member of both the College Football and NFL Halls of Fame. The Charles Chuck Bednarik Award is given annually to the outstanding lineman on the Penn football team in honor of the all-time All-American center.

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Bernard E. Berlinger, Sr.
Barney Berlinger was one of the great track and field performers in Pennsylvania history. A native of Philadelphia, he set school records in the javelin, pole vault and shot put. He was the recipient of the Sullivan Award, presented annually to the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States in 1931.

Following his freshman year of 1928, Berlinger finished third in the decathlon at the U.S. Olympic Trials and competed in that summer's Olympic Games in Amsterdam. He was the Penn Relays decathlon champion in 1929, 1930 and 1931, setting the Carnival record during his senior year (7735.6135 points). His best event of the 10 in his record-setting 1931 decathlon performance was the shot put, in which he scored 892.5875 points.

A 1931 graduate, Berlinger was the first recipient of the Class of 1915 Award, bestowed annually on that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

Following graduation with a degree from the Wharton School, he won the national AAU decathlon championship in 1934, and continued to compete nationally and internationally for several years. He returned to Pennsylvania in 1938 to become an assistant track coach to the legendary Lawson Robertson.

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Bernard E. Berlinger, Jr.
Barney Berlinger, Jr. followed in his father's athletic footsteps at Pennsylvania. A member of both the football and track teams, Berlinger set a then-school record of 14-feet, 4 ½-inches in the pole vault, an event where his father had set a school record 30 years earlier.

But it was on the football field that Berlinger left his mark at Pennsylvania. In 1958 he was the first Red and Blue player to be selected a first-team all-Ivy League performer, at end, and repeated that first-team selection in 1959 when he captained Pennsylvania's first Ivy League championship team. He was the team's leading pass receiver as both a junior and senior.

Like his father, he was awarded the Class of 1915 Award as that member of the senior class who most clearly approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete. He also received the Edgar Church Award from his football teammates as the senior player who had given the most to the team.

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Joseph W. Burk
A champion rower and 1939 recipient of the Sullivan Award as the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States, Joe Burk left his mark on the sport of crew as a coach.

As a competitor, Burk was the national single sculls champion four years in a row (1937-40) and two-time winner of the Diamond Sculls at England's Henley Regatta (1938-39). He captained Pennsylvania's crew team of 1936.

He returned to coach at Pennsylvania in 1951, and remained through 1969. Overall, he coached three crews at England's Henley Regatta with his 1955 squad emerging victorious. His 1968 varsity eight won the IRA championship, the first time Pennsylvania had won the title since 1900. Burk was also a training innovator, initiating weight and interval training programs that were not commonly in use in the 1950s and the 1960s. He once described himself as a coach by saying: I'm rather exacting in my demands and require utter dedication. I don't get out the whip and beat them, but they have to want to row very hard and very much.

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Gardner A. Cadwalader
Gardner Cadwalader was a powerful oarsman on some of Joe Burk's last varsity crews at Pennsylvania in the late 1960s.

At 6-1 and 205 pounds, the rugged Cadwalader was a member of perhaps one of Pennsylvania's greatest varsity heavyweight eights, the 1969 crew which won the Childs, Blackwell, Adams and Madeira Cups, the IRA Championship, and the Ten Eyck Trophy for the leading team point total at the IRA Regatta. The crew, Joe Burk's last as head coach, reached the finals of the Grand Challenge Cup at England's Henley Regatta that summer. In 1970, he stroked the varsity eight.

Before his senior year, Cadwalader rowed for the United States in the four with coxswain competition at the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games. A year earlier, he was part of a gold-medal winning crew in the Pan American Games, hosted in Winnipeg, Canada.

Cadwalader attended Cambridge Union University (St. John's College) and rowed in the Oxford-Cambridge boat race. Known as The Big Yank, Cadwalader helped lead Cambridge to victory in the spring of 1972.

Cadwalader returned to Pennsylvania after his Cambridge experience and received his master's in architecture. He worked as an architect for 20 years before becoming a stockbroker at Dean Witter in Philadelphia.

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David Corky Calhoun
Corky Calhoun is regarded as one of the most talented all-around players in Penn and Philadelphia Big Five history.

Playing three varsity seasons for teams which were a combined 78-6 and having won three Ivy League titles (41-1), Calhoun scored 1,066 points and was a three-time All-Big Five and All-Ivy League first team selection, and was named the Philadelphia Big Five Most Valuable Player as a senior. Pennsylvania played in the NCAA Tournament in each of Calhoun's three seasons, and reached the Eastern Regional championship game in 1971 and 1972. The 1970-71 team was ranked third in the nation in the AP's Final 1971-72 poll.

A complete and unselfish player, Calhoun handled whatever role was asked of him. He led the Quakers in rebounding his first two years and moved to the backcourt as a senior to take over the second guard spot after the departure of Steve Bilsky and Dave Whol.

A first-round draft choice by both the NBA Phoenix Suns and the ABA's Kentucky Colonels, Calhoun played for four teams in an eight-year NBA career, the longest professional playing career by any Pennsylvania basketball player.

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Richard J. Censits
Dick Censits (originally spelled Csencsitz) was a three-year varsity basketball starter from 1955-56 to 1957-58, and was named to the Philadelphia All-Big Five first team each of those years.

Censits finished his Pennsylvania career with 1,220 points and 867 rebounds, and is one of only six players to average double figures in both scoring and rebounding for his career. As a junior he as awarded the Arthur Kiefaber Award as the team's most valuable player, and as a senior he won the Bus McDonald Award as the team's most inspirational player. He was a first-team All-Ivy League selection as a senior.

Censits was elected to the Big Five Hall of Fame in 1981. In January, 1983, he was the recipient of an NCAA Silver Anniversary Award for his accomplishments as a college athlete and his subsequent achievements in the business community.

Still a very significant and active member of the Pennsylvania community, Censits is a Trustee of the University and a member of the Board.

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Donald A. Clune
Don Clune was selected to the All-Ivy League Silver Anniversary team in 1980, after a record-setting three-year varsity career in 1971-72-73 as a wide receiver.

Playing on teams that rewrote the Pennsylvania record book, Clune caught 121 passes for 2,419 yards (average of 20.0 yards per reception), and 21 touchdowns. His greatest game was against Harvard in 1971 when he caught 8 passes for 284 yards (1971), and 23.1 yards per reception (1972). Four of his touchdown receptions covered more than 70 yards.

Clune was also a hurdler and sprinter on the track team, and ran on the Penn Relays shuttle hurdles relay championship teams of 1972-73-74. As a senior, Clune was awarded the Class of 1915 Award as the member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

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Bruce R. Collins
Bruce Collins earned a permanent place in Pennsylvania's track and field annals as one of the outstanding collegiate hurdlers of the early 1970s.

An NCAA, IC4A and Heptagonal Games champion in the 400-intermeidate hurdles, Collins was the Penn Relays champion in the event in 1972 and 1973, and ran on the Carnival's shuttle hurdles relay championship teams in 1972, 1973 and 1974. In 1972, as a Pennsylvania sophomore, he ran the fourth fastest time in the U.S. Olympic trials. His school record for the event still stands, and his best time of 13.98 seconds for the 110-meter high hurdles is the second fastest ever run by a Quaker. Collins also ran the 400-meter leg in the still-standing school record of 9:41.6 for the distance medley relay, run in 1974.

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Maestro Lajos Csiszar
Just say, The Maestro, and all Pennsylvanians know you are referring to Lajos Cziszar, the legendary fencing master and head coach of NCAA champions and Olympic Games competitors.

The Maestro was considered the finest fencer in Europe when he left his native country for the United States in 1947. As Pennsylvania's head coach he guided the fencing team to two NCAA team championships (1953, 1969), and coached nine NCAA individual champions and 27 All-Americans. The 1953 NCAA title was the first ever won by any Pennsylvania varsity team.

Csiszar established the Salle Csiszar Club in Philadelphia, a training and practice club for many of the outstanding fencers in the country, and also a teaching center. He coached American fencers in Olympic and Pan-American Games, and in world championships.

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Eleanor Ellie Daniel
Ellie Daniel was one of the most decorated American swimmers of the late 1960s and early 1970s, a competitor in two Olympic Games, and a world record holder as both an individual and relay team member. While at Penn, she was a standout on the women's team but trained with the men's swim team during her undergraduate days. Her coach at Penn, Mary F. Kelly, was also her coach when she trained with the Vesper Boat Club Swimming Team and competed in the 1968 Olympics.

A specialist in the butterfly, Daniel set the world record for 200 meters four times, and swam the butterfly leg on four medley relay world records. She won the gold medal in the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City with the U.S. 400 meter medley relay team, and was a silver medallist (100 meter butterfly) and bronze medallist (200 meter butterfly). In the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, she won the bronze medal in the 200 butterfly after having set a world record for the event in the preliminaries.

Daniel was a national champion seven times during her swimming career and held 14 individual American and/or national records. She has been an executive member of the U.S. Olympic Committee, a member of the Athletes Advisory Council of the USOC, and was a member of the speakers bureau for the Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee before the 1984 Summer Games.

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Richard DiBatista
Dick DiBatista was one of the greatest wrestlers in Pennsylvania history. He finished his Quaker career as a two-time NCAA champion and only World War II could stop him from becoming a three-time NCAA champion. He can also lay claim to being the only Penn wrestler to go through his grade school, high school and collegiate career without ever losing a match.

Along with winning the intercollegiate championship twice, DiBatista won the Eastern championship three times. In 1941 he wrestled at 175 pounds and defeated Joseph Valla of Penn State for the Eastern title and Arthur Johnson of Iowa for the national championship, thus becoming the first Penn wrestler to win the national championship.

He has been inducted into both the National Wrestling and the National Wrestling Officials Hall of Fame.

DiBatista is another one of the Munger Men to be inducted in Pennsylvania's Hall of Fame. He was a lineman, who won three varsity football letters between 1940 and 1942 on Quaker teams, which posted a combined record of 18-5-2.

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Paul R. Friedberg
Paul Friedberg was the recipient of the Class of 1915 Award in 1981, the first fencer to receive the award which is presented annually to that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

Friedberg was a four-time all-Ivy League choice in sabre competition, a three-time All-American, and the NCAA sabre champion in 1980 and 1981. He was a member of Pennsylvania's 1981 NCAA championship team, and a member of the U.S. junior national team as an undergraduate, and competed for the United States in the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul.

Friedberg graduated with degrees from the Wharton School and from the College of Engineering and Applied Science. On learning of his selection as the Class of 1915 winner he said: Receiving this award brings Penn very close to my heart.

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Ronald Haigler
Ron Haigler was the first recipient of the Ivy League Player of the Year Award as a senior in 1974-75, and was the Philadelphia Big Five Player of the Year as both a junior and a senior. He was inducted into the Big Five Hall of Fame in 1982.

One of the most prolific offensive players in Penn history, Haigler's 1.522 career points is the third highest career scoring total in Pennsylvania's history, and he is one of four players to score more than 600 points in one season (606 in 1974-75). He played in the NCAA Tournament three times, on teams with a combined record of 64-20, and on teams which set a Big Five record of 12 consecutive victories in City Series games. Haigler holds the school record for field goals made in one season, 259 during his senior year.

Haigler won the Arthur Kiefaber Award as the team's most valuable player as both a junior and senior, and was drafted by both the Chicago Bulls (NBA) and Memphis Sounds (ABA).

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Richard A. Harter
Dick Harter won three varsity letters as a Pennsylvania basketball player, but is remembered more for his five seasons as the school's head basketball coach.

Replacing Jack McCloskey after the 1965-66 season, Harter's first two teams won a total of only 25 games. His last two, however, won 25 and 28 games, the beginning of a streak of six consecutive 20-victory seasons and eight in the next 10 years for teams coached by Chuck Daly and Bob Weinhauer. Harter's last two teams were a perfect 28-0 in Ivy League games and 8-0 in the Philadelphia Big Five. His last Pennsylvania team, in 1970-71, had a 28-1 record, reached the NCAA Tournament's Eastern Regional Championship game, and was ranked third in the final Associated Press national poll. Harter left Penn to take over the head coaching job at the University of Oregon and later took over the head job at Penn State. Harter was inducted into the Big Five Hall of Fame in 1993.

Since leaving the college coaching ranks, Harter has enjoyed a successful career in the NBA, serving as head coach of the Charlotte Hornets, as an assistant under Pat Riley with the New York Knicks and is currently on P.J. Carlesimo's staff with the Portland Trailblazers.

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William M. Hollenback
Bill Hollenback was regarded as one of the great football players during the first decade of the 20th century. The fullback on Walter Camp's 1908 All-American team, he played several positions on Pennsylvania varsity teams between 1904 and 1908, plying on teams which had combined records of 41-3-4, and captaining the undefeated (11-0-1) team of 1908. He scored the Quakers' final touchdown of that season during a 17-0 victory over Cornell.

Hollenback received a degree in dentistry from Pennsylvania, but never practiced as a dentist. Instead he went right into football coaching after graduation, at Penn State, Missouri, Pennsylvania Military College and Syracuse, retiring from that profession in 1916. He remained active in collegiate football by becoming a game official, while also becoming an executive in the coal industry.

Hollenback was elected to the National Football Hall of Fame in 1951 and to the Helms Foundation Football Hall of Fame in 1959. The name Hollenback will forever be associated with Pennsylvania athletics because of the Hollenback Center, the training center located adjacent to the River Fields complex.

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Peter H. Hollis
Pete Hollis had one of the finest careers of any Quaker lacrosse player ever and he capped it off by being named First Team All-American for his performance during the 1977 season. When he had played his final game at Franklin Field, the senior captain left as the all-time career leader in points scored (173) and assists (94), and tied the single-season record for goals in a season (34) and points scored in a season (75).

Nearly 20 years after his last game as a Quaker, Hollis' mark of 75 points in a season is still a record and both his career assists record (94) and total points scored mark (173) are still both second on the all-time lists.

Hollis was a three-time all-Ivy League selection and was selected to play in the North-South game and was also named Co-Most Outstanding Player with teammate and fellow Hall of Fame Inductee Mike Page.

During Hollis' playing career the Quakers were 21-12 overall and 12-6 in the Ivy League (one of the best three-year periods in the history of Quaker lacrosse). As a senior, Hollis was awarded the Class of 1915 Award as that member of the senior class who, most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

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Donald S. Kellett
One of the greatest all-around athletes in Penn history, Don Kellett won nine varsity letters at Pennsylvania, three each in football, basketball and baseball, during the early 1930s.

He led the football team in scoring as a junior and senior, and played on basketball teams with a combined record of 28-9 during his junior and senior years. He captained the basketball team as a senior. In 1934, he batted .459 for the baseball team, still the all-time highest single-season batting average in Pennsylvania baseball records, and hit eight home runs. He played briefly for the Boston Red Sox in the summer of 1934 following his graduation.

Don Kellett was the winner of the Class of 1915 Award as a senior, which is awarded to that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

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Jack Kelly
The son of an Olympic champion, Jack Kelly followed his father as an outstanding American rower.

The winner of the Sullivan Award as the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States in 1947, Kelly won the Diamond Sculls event at England's Henley Regatta in both 1947 and 1949, an event in which his father had been prohibited in competing in 1920. He competed in the Olympic Games four times, and won two Pan-American Games gold medals in 1955 (single sculls) and 1959 (doubles).

Kelly was an elected member of Philadelphia's City Council, and was active throughout his life as a benefactor for civic projects in the Philadelphia area. He served as president of the Amateur Athletic Union, was vice-president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, and was president of the International Swimming Hall of Fame.

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Henry Kozloff
Henry Kozloff was one of the most versatile athletes to ever have competed for Penn, earning eight varsity letters for baseball, basketball and soccer, and playing on six championship caliber teams.

Kozloff played on basketball teams that twice won the Eastern Intercollegiate League Championships (1934 and 1935), with combined records of 32-7. In recognition of his performance, he earned all-league honors and was presented the Arthur Kiefaber Award as the basketball team's most valuable player.

During his junior and senior years, the baseball and soccer teams also captured league titles. As a star third baseman for Penn, Kozloff's performance led to his being drafted by the Boston Red Sox. He turned down the opportunity to play professional baseball in order to pursue the study of medicine.

Kozloff received numerous awards both as an undergraduate at Penn and subsequent to graduation. He was the recipient of the Cane Award (a senior honor award) and in 1969 was the winner of the University's prestigious Alumni Award of Merit. All three of his children, Louis, James and Susan, competed on Pennsylvania teams.

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Bernie Lemonick
Bernie Lemonick was regarded as one of the best lineman in the nation during his brilliant career for the Quakers from 1948-50. In fact, he was named to several All-America teams after his senior season and played in the East-West Shrine game, the Hula Bowl and for the NFL's College All-Star team against the Cleveland Browns.

In an era when newspaper wire services chose national players of the week, he was selected once in 1949 (vs. Dartmouth) and once in 1950 (vs. Wisconsin) as the national lineman of the week. In 1985 he received the Distinguished American Award from the National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame.

A native of Philadelphia, Lemonick returned to Pennsylvania as an assistant football coach for five seasons, and was the defensive line coach for the school's first Ivy League championship team in 1959.

He recently received the 1996 University of Pennsylvania Alumni Award of Merit in recognition of outstanding service to the school and was inducted into the state of Pennsylvania's 1995 Sports Hall of Fame City all-star chapter.

Presently Lemonick is the head of the Mungermen (varsity football letterwinners under George Munger from 1938 to 1953) and serves as Chairman of the University of Pennsylvania/Cornell University Trustees Cup annual awards dinner. The dinner recognizes each year's winning football team and celebrates the 102 year-old football tradition between the two schools.

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William E. Lingelbach, Jr.
Bill Lingelbach played for legendary soccer coach Douglas Stewart in the early 1920s, and still is among the all-time leading goal scorers in Pennsylvania history.

A member of early All-America teams in 1923 and 1924, Lingelbach is third in school history with 41 goals scored in his varsity career, and tied for first with 20 goals scored during one season (1924). He scored five goals in a game against Cornell that season.

Pennsylvania won the 1923 and 1924 Intercollegiate Soccer Championships, and Lingelbach was cited by the University of Pennsylvania Record as a driving force in the Quakers' success. Bill Lingelbach, through the combination of such characteristics as a positive personality, clean sportsmanship and untiring efforts, has been one of the outstanding figures in this wonderful machine.

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Howard Zip Long
Although he pitched for Pennsylvania in the 1920s, Howard Zip Long is still considered one of the finest baseball players to ever play for the Quakers. He was named to both Pennsylvania's All-Time Baseball squad, as well as the All-Decade team, and he still holds several all-time school records.

His 12 pitching victories in 1925 and his 11 victories in 1926 are the first and second most wins, respectively, in one season by a Pennsylvania pitcher, and his 16 consecutive victories during those two seasons, his sophomore and junior years, is another school mark. In his senior year he was hampered by a leg injury sustained as a varsity fullback, but still managed to go 6-0 on the mound. His three-year varsity pitching record was 29-1. Long won one varsity football letter in 1926, serving as both a punter and fullback.

After graduation, Long served his alma mater as an assistant baseball coach (1927-31) and played briefly for John McGraw's New York Giants after graduation. Two of his daughters, Maude Long March and Elizabeth Long Hansel played field hockey and lacrosse at Pennsylvania, and a granddaughter, Emily Hansel, currently plays both of those sports at Pennsylvania.

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H. Hunter Lott, Jr.
Hunter Lott is enshrined in the National Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Hall of Fame, and his name is enshrined on the tennis courts, which bear his name on Pennsylvania's campus.

Lott has been involved with the game of squash for all of his adult life, as a player, coach, and administrator. He won the national singles titles in 1949, and was the national doubles champion eight times, the first one in 1938 two years after his graduation from Pennsylvania, the last one 15 years later in 1953. He served first as vice president and then president of the U.S. Squash Racquets Association, and was awarded that association's President's Cup in 1970.

Besides the Lott Courts which bear his name, Hunter Lott is also a supporter of the Ringe Squash Courts.

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P. Todd Makler, Jr.
Todd Makler followed in his father's footsteps as a fencer, competing in the 1972 Olympic Games for the United States, 20 years after his father did.

Makler was a first-team All-American in sabre in 1967 and 1968, and was NCAA individual sabre champion both years. He continued to compete following graduation, and had just received a degree from the Medical School in 1972 when he won his Olympic team berth, in epee, the same as his father did in 1952.

The Makler fencing tradition at Pennsylvania continued after Todd's graduation. His younger brother Brooke was also a two-time All-American, in foil, and an NCAA champion himself in 1973.

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Sherry A. Marcantonio
Sherry Marcantonio was an all-Ivy League performer in both field hockey and lacrosse, and the winner of the Julie Staver Award as the top athlete in those two sports as a senior in 1983. She also captained both sports as a senior.

Marcantonio was a defender in field hockey, but left her mark on the lacrosse record books. She is Pennsylvania's all-time leading scorer with 237 points, on 129 goals and 108 assists, both also the top all-time school totals. She had 33 assists in one season, and six assists in one game, two more school records. A three-year All-Ivy selection, Marcantonio was also an All-American in 1982 when Pennsylvania won the EAIWA Eastern Regional championship.

At her graduation, Marcantonio was the recipient of the Fathers Award, presented annually to Pennsylvania's outstanding senior woman student-athlete.

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Alicia McConnell
Alicia McConnell was a national champion before she enrolled at Pennsylvania.

McConnell was a two-time national junior squash champion while in high school, won the national 18-and-under national title three times, and the Canadian junior championship four times. At 16, she won the junior championship at the first International Squash Racquets Federation World Championships. She would continue to be a champion as a collegian.

She won both intercollegiate and national singles championships while a member of the varsity squash team, and continued after her graduation in 1985 to be the No. 1 ranked woman's player in the nation. Proving her athletic versatility, McConnell won varsity letters in both field hockey and lacrosse for Pennsylvania, two sports she had never played before joining the varsity squads.


Edward F. McGinley, Jr.
Big Ed McGinley was a unanimous All-American choice as a tackle in 1924, playing on a Pennsylvania team which had a 9-1-1 record and allowed opponents only 31 points in 11 games. After the season, Penn was selected as the best team in the East in preference to Dartmouth and Yale on the strength of its superior defense, which was considered the best unit in the nation.

Walter Camp, who invented All-American teams, said of McGinley: He has the greatest of assets consistency. He has played no poor games. He is the ideal tackle.

The 1925 University of Pennsylvania Record hailed McGinley as both a great athlete and sportsman: Ed McGinley had found the plenary might of All-American tackle the best tackle of his time, and one of the truest sportsmen.

McGinley's athletic contributions to the University of Pennsylvania did not end with his own exploits. All three of his sons, Edward, Gerald and Richard, played varsity football under George Munger and became Munger Men. This sense of Penn tradition strongly influenced Gerry McGinley to establish the Edward F. McGinley, Jr. Scholarship Fund.

McGinley was a pioneer in professional football, playing for the New York Giants after graduation and was selected for the National Football Foundation College Hall of Fame.

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David A. Merrick
Twenty years after he last ran for Pennsylvania, Dave Merrick is still considered the greatest long distance runner in school history.

Merrick's time of 28:49.2 for 10,000 meters, run in 1972, is 58 seconds better than the second fastest time in school records, and his time of 23:51 over Van Cordlandt Park's championship cross country course in New York City is still the all-time school record. He also ran the anchor mile on another school record, the 6,400-meter relay (15:09.8).

Merrick's best NCAA cross country finish was ninth place in his senior year of 1975. He was a member of three outdoor Heptagonal Games championship teams.

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Anthony Skip Minisi
Skip Minisi was an All-American halfback with Pennsylvania's undefeated football team of 1947, won varsity letters as a freshman, junior and senior, and played against his alma mater as a sophomore in 1945.

After his freshman year, Minisi was drafted for military service, but was permitted to transfer to the Naval Academy. He scored the winning touchdown with 24 seconds to play in the game in which Navy defeated the Quakers, 14-7. With World War II over, Minisi transferred back to Pennsylvania to complete his college education.

Minisi rushed for 1,390 yards in his Pennsylvania career, and his 150 points scored is still the seventh highest career total in school history. When Pennsylvania played the Naval Academy in 1946, Minisi scored two touchdowns for the Quakers in a 32-19 victory.

Sportswriter Jesse Abramson tabbed Minisi as the top wingback in the country as a senior and described him as a polished all-around performer, a rapid runner, solid blocker, devastating southpaw passer, and safety man.

Minisi served as a college football official for over 30 years, and was enshrined in the National Football Foundation College Hall of Fame in 1985.

He presently serves as a Trustee of the University and as a member of Penn's Athletic Advisory Board.

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Robert Morse
Bobby Morse teamed with Corky Calhoun for three basketball seasons, from 1969-70 to 1971-72, which were three of the most successful in school history.

Morse was the leading scorer on each of those teams, finishing his Pennsylvania career with 1,381 points. An all-Ivy League first-team selection as a senior, he was also an all-Philadelphia Big Five first team member as a junior and a senior. During his first three varsity seasons, Pennsylvania had records of 25-2, 28-1 and 25-3. He captained the '72 squad and was awarded the Class of 1915 Award as that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

A member of the Big Five Hall of Fame (since 1977), Morse was drafted by the NBA's Buffalo Braves, but never played in an American professional basketball league. He opted to play professionally in Europe, and is still regarded as one of the greatest American players ever to play in the European professional leagues, playing most of his career in Italy. Currently he makes his home in Rome.

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George Munger
In 16 years as Pennsylvania's head football coach, George Munger coached 14 All-American players, five Hall of Fame enshrinees, and teams that won 84 games. During that period, Franklin Field was sold out and Penn led the nation in attendance. His teams won or tied for the unofficial Ivy title in nine of those seasons, losing just six of their 62 Ivy games. They also beat Army four times and Navy nine times.

But he was more than a football coach to the Munger Men who played for him. He was an educator, a leader and a man his players looked up to. According to many observers, the key to Munger's success was simple; he loved his players, and they reciprocated. There was little his players would not do for him, on or off the field. He was forever loyal to his school, remaining as an administrator at Pennsylvania after he left the coaching profession.

Munger was an outstanding athlete as an undergraduate, winner of three football letters from 1930 to 1932, and was champion of the decathlon in the 1932 Penn Relays. As a coach and player his teams had only one losing season, and regularly played before crowds of more than 60,000 in Franklin Field.

At the time of Munger's death in 1994, Chuck Bednarik, one of his greatest players, paid this tribute: He was a man who seldom raised his voice. He was just a different breed of man. Success seemed to come naturally to him.

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Bob Odell
One of the great football players of the 1940s, Bob Odell received the Maxwell Award in 1943, and finished second in the voting for the Heisman Trophy, the closest a Pennsylvania player has ever come to winning the award named for a former Pennsylvania coach.

Odell, who captained the team as a senior, played on teams that had a combined 18-6-1 record, and was an All-American halfback as a senior. His teammates voted him the Edgar Church Award as the senior who contributed the most to Pennsylvania football, and he was the recipient of the Class of 1915 Award, bestowed annually on that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

He returned to Pennsylvania as head football coach for six seasons (1965-70), and also coached at Bucknell and Williams. In 1992, he became the 20th former Pennsylvania football player to be inducted into the National Football Foundation College Hall of Fame.

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Mary Jane O'Neill
Mary Jane O'Neill was the first Pennsylvania women fencer to represent the United States in the Olympic Games, in 1988 in Seoul and again in 1992 in Barcelona.

O'Neill was a three-time all-Ivy League selection in foil (1984-1986), and a three-time first-team All-American (1983-85), and was the NCAA individual champion as a sophomore in 1984. As a senior captain, she also led the 1986 team to the NCAA team championship, the first by a Pennsylvania women's varsity team.

Following her senior year, O'Neill was the recipient of the Fathers Award, given annually to Pennsylvania's outstanding senior woman student-athlete.

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Michael R. Page
Michael Page played for the U.S. All-World Lacrosse Team in 1978 and 1982. A strong midfielder, he ranks as one of the leading scorers in Penn history with 112 points (eighth all-time) and 80 goals (7th currently and first when he graduated) in only three seasons.

As co-captain his senior year, Page earned first-team All-America honors after being a third-team selection in 1975 and 1976. In addition, he was named first-team All-Ivy in 1976 and 1977. Page was selected to play in the North-South game following his senior year and was also named Co-Most Outstanding Player with teammate and fellow Hall of Fame Inductee Peter Hollis.

Page was named the NCAA Division I midfielder of the year as a senior, and won the NCAA Heroes Award as the outstanding midfielder in college lacrosse that season.
During Page's playing career the Quakers were 21-12 overall and 12-6 in the Ivy League (one of the best three-year periods in the history of Quaker lacrosse). He coached at Pennsylvania for one season and was a player/coach with the Philadelphia Wings from 1988 to 1994. During that time the Wings won a pair of World Indoor Championships. In 1993 he was inducted into the Long Island Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

In 1981 he was selected as the National Player of the Year by the U.S. Club Lacrosse Association.

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Palmer T.H. Page
One of the most talented squash players in Penn history, Palmer Page won the National Intercollegiate Squash Racquets Association collegiate singles championship in 1971 as a junior, defeating Pennsylvania teammate Elliot Berry in the final game. A graduate of Episcopal Academy, Page led the Quakers to an 8-1 record as a junior. He was undefeated his last two years in Ivy play and was named to the All-Ivy first team in 1970, '71 and '72. As captain of the 1972 team, the hard-hitting Page led the Quakers to a 9-2 record. During his final two seasons, Page won 15 of 18 matches.

After graduation he teamed with former Pennsylvania woman's coach Nina Moyer to win a national mixed doubles championship.

In 1994, while working for IBM, he represented Japan on the Japanese National Team in the Southeast Asian Championships. He was the only foreigner to represent Japan in a national sport.

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Anthony Price
Tony Price saved his best for last as a Pennsylvania basketball player, leading the 1978-79 Quakers to championships of the Ivy League and Philadelphia Big Five, the championship of the NCAA Tournament's Eastern Regional, and to Pennsylvania's only appearance in the NCAA Final Four.

Price led Pennsylvania in scoring (633) and rebounding (279) as a senior, and a 21-5 regular-season record. He then paced the Quakers through an amazing four-game run in the NCAA Tournament. Price scored 27 points in a 73-69 win over Iona in the first round and scored 25 points in a 72-71 victory over North Carolina. He followed that with 20 points against Michigan State and 31 points against DePaul in the national semifinal and third-place game.

Price was named Ivy League and Big Five Player of the Year as a senior, and was voted into the Big Five Hall of Fame in 1985.

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Francis X. Reagan
More than 50 years after he last played football for Pennsylvania, the name Frank Reagan still stands near the top of several categories in the Pennsylvania record book. Reagan was a varsity player during George Munger's first three years as head coach of the Quakers, in 1938, 1939, and 1940. His 135 points scored is still ninth all-time in Pennsylvania history and his 103 points scored as a senior is the second most in one season in 118 years of Pennsylvania football. Reagan had one of the great individual performances of all time against Princeton on Oct. 19, 1940, rushing for 200 yards, scoring 5 touchdowns and 31 points in a 46-28 victory at Franklin Field. In a game at Michigan in 1938, Reagan was responsible for 356 total yards, rushing for 85, passing for 188, returning kickoffs for 82 and punts for 21.

A captain of both football and baseball teams, he was awarded the 1941Class of 1915 Award as that member of the senior class who most closely approaches the ideal University of Pennsylvania student-athlete.

Reagan played one season in the NFL with the New York Giants before World War II, and then returned to play for the Giants and the Philadelphia Eagles for a total of six seasons following the war.

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Charles R. Scott
Before his retirement in 1981, Charley Scott served Pennsylvania athletics as a player, coach and administrator for nearly 50 years.

An All-American soccer player as an undergraduate, he coached 19 All-Americans in 25 seasons as head soccer coach (141 victories), and was a friend to every Pennsylvania athlete and coach during his tenure as coach and assistant Director of Athletics. He received numerous honors from national soccer organizations, and was enshrined in the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 1993. Scott received an Alumni Award of Merit in 1981, and the following inscription was on his plaque:

Behind your uncommon record stands an uncommon man. Anyone who has ever played for you or worked with you has not forgotten your efficiency and industry, your keen sense of responsibility, your willing ness to take on the difficult task without recognition, your friendliness and sportsmanship, and your gentlemanly manner. Few people have so much class; few people by their personal demeanor have brought so much distinction to themselves, their profession and their University.

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Stanley E. Startzell
Stan Startzell was a three-time soccer All-American (1969, 1970, 1971) playing on teams which participated in the NCAA Tournament for three consecutive years. He was also an All-Ivy placekicker for the 1971 football team. At the time he was the only athlete to be named All-Ivy in two sports in the same season.
He scored 18 goals in his varsity career, and assisted on 16 goals by teammates. Startzell was the recipient of the David L. Gould Trophy as the team's most valuable player as a senior.

Following graduation, Startzell played professional soccer with both the New York Cosmos and Philadelphia Atoms. He has worked with the United States Olympic Committee, the World Cup and the Special Olympics.

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Julia Ann Staver
Julie Staver was Pennsylvania's outstanding athlete when women's athletics was accorded varsity team status in the early 1970s.

The recipient of the Fathers Award as Pennsylvania's outstanding senior woman athlete in 1974, she was an All-American in field hockey (1973) and lacrosse (1973, 1974). Staver captained the 1980 U.S. Olympic field hockey team, and was a co-captain of the 1984 bronze-medal winning Olympic team. She played on numerous U.S. national field hockey and lacrosse teams throughout the 1970s and 1980s, including field hockey World Cup teams in 1979 and 1982, and was inducted into the U.S. Field Hockey Association Hall of Fame in 1989.

Staver returned to Pennsylvania after graduation to study for a degree in veterinary medicine, which she received in 1982. The field hockey and lacrosse programs now annually present the Julie Staver Award to the outstanding athlete who competes in both sports.

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